Publications

In this section you will find all GAPW-related publications that are not part of our regional conference reporting. Those can be found under ‘Conference Reports.’

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“Looking to the Future of the Arms Trade Treaty”
FES Perspective, April 2013

logo1After more than one decade of preparations and negotiations, the UN General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in April 2013. The ATT sets important precedents for working towards the goals of prohibiting arms transfers to countries where there is serious risk of violations of human rights and humanitarian law and where arms could potentially thwart peace and security. In addition, the adopted treaty underlines the significance of greater transparency and accountability in global arms trade. However, this publication highlights various shortcomings and loopholes of the ATT. Despite the potential the treaty bears, it remains rather symbolic and normative in meaning. The treaty does not reflect what the majority of states had originally called for, but is, through a consensus-driven process, confined to agreements on the lowest common denominator. More importantly, the adoption of the treaty is not a victory in-and-of-itself, but merely the first step in a long process ranging from ratification, effective work of the Conference of States Parties, to robust implementation. The author emphasizes the importance of securing the rapid entry into force of the ATT and of safeguarding the participation of the largest arms-trading nations. Otherwise, the ATT will stay a rather imperfect treaty failing to counteract the severe consequences of illicit and unregulated arms trade.

The full download is available here.

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March 2013

“The Arms Trade Treaty and the Control of Dual-Use Goods and Technologies”

ieslogoblock90Co-authored by Daniel Fiott of the Institute for European Studies (IES) in Brussels, this paper seeks to delineate some preliminary factors and working methods that could work in favour of establishing a workable international export control regime for dual-use goods and technologies. Drawing on the work initiated by various United Nations initiatives and the Wassenaar Agreement, but specifically looking at the European Union export regime model, this working paper asks if and how a similar model could be adopted at the international level. Accordingly, this paper asks what elements of the EU’s control regime could be of international benefit after the ATT negotiations and how it could be adopted on a more international basis. Indeed, any future ATT control mechanism for dual-use items will have to draw on existing arms transfers and control regimes. It does this through an analysis of the ATT and the current discourse on dual-use goods and technologies in the negotiations, an stocktaking of the strengths and weaknesses of the EU’s export control regime and by asking what elements of the EU’s regime could be utilised for international control mechanisms after a future ATT is negotiated.

The full PDF is available here.

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February 2013

european_peace_and_security_studies_logo_global_governance_instituteGGI Policy Brief: “8 Concrete Proposals for the Arms Trade Treaty Conference”

The legitimacy and profitability of the global arms trade make arms control measures often difficult to realize. The prospective Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) aims to regulate the trade in conventional arms, rather than to limit or outlaw it. From 2 - 27 July 2012 the member states of the United Nations (UN) gathered in New York to participate in the UN Conference on the ATT. These four weeks of negotiations produced a draft treaty text, but no consensus could be reached on a final text for adoption. In this GGI Analysis, Katherine Prizeman and Niels van Willigen provide essential background and concrete recommendation for a last effort to negotiate a consensus treaty during the Final UN Conference on the Arms Trade Treaty, scheduled to take place 18 - 28 March 2013.

The full brief is available here.

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November 19, 2012

1UNODA Publication, “Civil Society and Disarmament 2012 - Applying a Disarmament Lens to Gender, Human Rights, Development, Security, Education and Communication: Six Essays”

The publication features six essays on disarmament topics by civil society actors. The essays are:

  • Merging Disarmament and Development Priorities
  • Minimizing the impact of illicit small arms and diverted weapons transfers in the commission of atrocity crimes, human rights violations and other violence
  • The Role of Non-Nuclear Weapon States to Advance the Abolition of Nuclear Weapons
  • Incorporating a Women, Peace and Security Lens into Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) Programmes and Priorities
  • Encouraging Government Efforts to Increase Participation of Women in Disarmament Policy, Education and Advocacy
  • New Communication Tools in Disarmament Education: Using social media and technologies to enhance cross-cultural movement building

The downloadable PDF is available here.

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March 8, 2012 | New York, NY

att_prizeman_fes_brief_pagenumber001Published in the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) ‘International Policy Analysis’ series, “From Preparations to Negotiations for an Arms Trade Treaty” is a policy analysis paper detailing the various facets of the evolving process of the ATT from its inception in the original General Assembly resolution from 2006 through the upcoming July 2012 UN negotiating conference.

Global Action’s International Coordinator, Katherine Prizeman, lays forth the primary issue areas to be negotiated and the main summary positions of the regional blocs and main actors as well as the political context within which the treaty will have to be negotiated this summer. Perhaps most importantly, the author offers a series of recommendations to be considered that will provide for the best chances of formal adoption of an effective and robust ATT in the long term.

For full access to the paper, please click here.

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Why Women? Effective engagement for small arms control (IANSA, October 2011)iansa_why_women_2011_pagenumber001

The Global Action team was recently interviewed by Corey Barr, an independent consultant for the International Action Network Against Small Arms (IANSA), on the role of women in small arms and light weapons (SALWs) disarmament and non-proliferation programs and policy making. We were pleased to contribute to the report that IANSA has produced encouraging the full implementation of UN General Assembly Resolution 65/69 (2010) “Women, disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control” adopted at last year’s session of the GA, a resolution that is a clear complement to Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) regarding “Women, Peace and Security.”

The publication outlines current conditions of engagement and leadership for women in disarmament as well as the negative roles women can play in promoting gun violence and undermining peace and security. Ms. Barr recognizes several challenges faced by women in this field, including unequal positioning, exclusion from legislation and policy, a lack of issue knowledge, as well as sidelining gender in the disarmament discourse. Nonetheless, the author offers important areas for action such as education, advocacy and awareness raising, technical training for women, and adequate addressing of societal masculinities.

For access to the full publication, please click here.
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Nuclear Abolition Forum, October 2011

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Two of Global Action’s partners, the Lawyers’ Committee on Nuclear Policy (LCNP) and Global Security Institute, recently launched the first edition of a new publication entitled “Nuclear Abolition Forum,” a joint project of eight organizations to provide a platform for new ideas and initiatives related to nuclear abolition. The forum consists of a website and periodical and addresses the technical, legal, institutional, and political aspects of nuclear abolition. This edition focuses on “International Humanitarian Law and Nuclear Weapons: Examining the humanitarian approach to nuclear disarmament” with contributions from various experts, including our close partner John Burroughs of LCNP.

For more information, please visit the Nuclear Abolition Forum website.

The first edition of the periodical is available here.

More information on the launch can be found here.

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bulletin57_pagenumber001GAPW has been featured in the July/August newsletter of our partner the Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC). Our International Coordinator Katherine Prizeman provided an article discussing how human security concerns have been redefined through new media and social technology widening public discourse on issues of global concern from mass atrocity crimes to disarmament. Commonly known as Web 2.0, social media tools and networking technologies have altered the rules of engagement for diplomacy, both official and unofficial. Human security challenges no longer fall exclusively under the purview of state officials and UN staff, but are open to a growing number of academics, advocates and avid networkers.

GAPW has embraced this media movement as it has helped to expand our communication opportunities to better service and engage with diverse global constituents and advocate for the integration of new perspectives into policy at UN Headquarters. We believe that an expansive network of diverse communication tools is indispensable to the work of a multifaceted human security agenda.

For the full newsletter from BICC, please click here.

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U.S. MILITARY SPENDING: Hundreds of Billions for Foreign Wars. How Much for National Defense? by Randall Forsberg and Alex Carlin (Updated by Alex Carlin July 2011)

“Alex Carlin’s brilliant report shows, once and for all, that we can safely cut the Pentagon’s annual allowance by $500 billion so long as we are willing to stop acting like an empire.” Matthew Rothschild, Editor and Publisher, The Progressive

Following in the footsteps of GAPW co-founder Randy Forsberg, Alex Carlin has revised an earlier piece co-written with Forsberg that examines the vast amounts of US military spending that is less about defending the US homeland and more about fulfilling core foreign policy objectives. Massive military expenditures overseas - including military operations in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan and the presence of US military personnel and bases in dozens of other countries — constitute an enormous (and often needless) portion of the regular defense budget. Carlin breaks down the most recent numbers and helps us take charge of a budget that is much more likely to bankrupt our children than provide the security we seem to crave.

It is commonly understood that military spending, while perhaps beneficial in local contexts, is the least cost-effective way to promote economic growth in the US or any other nation. Despite this fact, global military budgets continue to expand. And in cases such as the US where modest defense cuts are being contemplated, voices from politics, policy and the military are raised in protest. Many believe in the pursuit of a globalized military based in part on US entitlement and in part on the dubious assertion that ‘we need to fight them over there so we don’t have to fight them over here.’

Alex Carlin’s updated article on US military spending is available here.

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“Trust but Verify: Building Cultures of Support for the Responsibility to Protect Norm,” by Robert Zuber and Ana Carolina Barry Laso

gr2pPublished in the September 2011 edition of the Global Responsibility to Protect Journal, GAPW Director Robert Zuber and former staff member Ana Carolina Barry Laso explore how truth issues permeate all security policy deliberations, including recent UN discussions around the R2P norm and implementation of its three ‘pillars.’ The authors underscore the importance of trust in three areas—trust in the viability of the norm itself, trust in the persons most closely related to the norm, and trust in the institutions and persons responsible to ‘house’ and ultimately implement the norm. The authors suggest that as the implementation process shifts from the ‘first pillar,’ state-controlled preventative and early warning capacities, to the ‘third pillar,’ last resort direct responses to atrocity crimes, the need for dependable bonds of trust between policymakers, R2P advocates, and diplomats is evermore vital.

For the full article, please click here.

For access to the whole journal, please click here.

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“Small Arms Trade: Disarmament vs. Regulation?”

May 24, 2011 | UN Headquarters, NY, NY

logoWe are thrilled to announce that Jessica Erdman, a research assistant at Global Action, has recently been published in World Politics Review as she discusses the recent Meeting of Government Experts (MGE) on the Program of Action on small arms and light weapons. In her article entitled “Small Arms Trade: Disarmament vs. Regulation,” Jessica highlights the importance of addressing the small arms and light weapons (SALWs) trade, which is at worst unregulated and at best uneven. She discusses small arms in light of former Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s famous assertion that small arms are the “real weapons of mass destruction.” In contrast to the regulatory systems for chemical and biological weapons, the regulation of the international trade in SALWs is in dire need of systemization. Jessica also appropriately underscores the linkage between small arms proliferation and human rights abuses.

For the full article, please click here.

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Women’s Participation as a Development Priority

March 2011

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GAPW is pleased to announce that a co-authored article by Jenneth Macan Markar, Kavitha Suthanthiraraj, and Robert Zuber has been included in InterAction’s March edition of its “Monday Developments Magazine.” The article underscores the importance of women’s participation for development.

Women have long fought for an equal voice in the home, at work and in government. Moreover, most development-related officials, whether from religious organizations, civil society, international NGOs or governments have long recognized the positive benefits of having more women involved in the formation and implementation of security and development policy, helping to address daunting obstacles to full participation caused by major disruptions in the security sector. But even in dire circumstances, there are strategic opportunities for development and faith based groups to help overcome participation barriers. Over the past decade the critical importance of women’s participation in peace processes and policies has been recognized through numerous international institutions, resolutions and state commitments-including UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (SCR 1325), adopted in October 2000. A limited number of states have adopted SCR 1325 National Action Plans, and a set of global indicators to track implementation was formally approved by the Council on 26 October 2010.

Given our view that our responsibilities to the MDGs and implementation of SCR 1325 go hand in hand, development organizations are urged to work more closely with UN agencies, rights-based groups and local/regional women to guarantee participation. In this effort SCR 1325 can both guide and inspire faith based and development organizations in their efforts to promote full participation of women in political, development and peace processes.

For the full article in PDF form, please click here.

For access to the full March edition of “Monday Developments Magazine” from InterAction, please click here.

See also recent remarks by Executive Director Of UN Women, Michelle Bachelet, on rule of law and development as they relate to women.

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Report on Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict in Colombia

March 25, 2011 | 866 UN Plaza, NY, NY

2011-03-23-report-english_pagenumber001The U.S. Office on Colombia and the Campaign “Rape and other Violences: Leave my Body Out of the War” coordinated a delegation of Colombian women to New York to present the findings of a recent survey on the magnitude of sexual violence against Colombian women in the context of the armed conflict. The delegation of women had the opportunity to meet with members of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security. Subsequently, Global Action was privileged to host the women for an informal discussion of the situation of armed internal conflict in Colombia as the main motor behind violations against women.

The report concludes that more than 480,000 Colombian women have suffered some type of sexual violence between 2002 and 2009 in areas where there is the presence of legal and illegal armed actors. Almost 90% of these crimes are not reported and those that are continue in impunity.

* To read the report in English, please click here.
* To read the Executive Summary in English, please click here.
* Para leer el reporte en Español, pulse aquí.

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Healing the Wounds: Speech, Identity & Reconciliation in Rwanda and Beyond

healing_the_wounds_final_pagenumber001The Program in Holocaust and Human Rights Studies and the Human Rights and Genocide Clinic at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, in association with Global Action to Prevent War, has released a new report, “Healing the Wounds: Speech, Identity and Reconciliation in Rwanda and Beyond.” The report is based on a 2009 conference at the Cardozo Law School in New York during which a distinguished group of scholars and practitioners examined the ways in which individual and group conceptions of identity are defined and enforced through the intervention of law and, in particular, the 2008 Rwandan “genocide ideology law.”

Following the conference, the strengths and limitations of this legal strategy were examined with implications for policy and practice for both the international community and the governments of states emerging from cycles of violence. A central challenge confronting all societies emerging from genocide, other mass atrocities, or ethnic conflicts is establishing a durable, trusting relationship across ethnic and religious lines. These policy recommendations seek to address this challenge.

For the report in PDF form, please click here.

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Promoting Women’s Participation in Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies

GAPW has written and published a book on “Promoting Women’s Participation in Conflict & Post-Conflict Societies” in conjunction with the NGOWG on Women, Peace and Security and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. The book was just launched at the United Nations University in Tokyo and will soon be launched at the United Nations in New York.

book-coverThis volume, the second in a projected three-part series, represents a large and growing global community’s determination and passion for promoting women’s full participation in peace policies and processes. The objective of this report is to highlight national and community-based initiatives undertaken by women’s organizations and civil society actors seeking a more prominent role for women at the peace table. Therefore, the book examines the different roles played by women worldwide - as government representatives, activists, leaders of NGOs and women’s networks or simply concerned citizens – who have persevered through threats and conditions of violence to initiate transformative processes within conflict and post conflict societies.

The ultimate goal of the book is to encourage policymakers at the UN and other international organizations to acknowledge what many of us have known for some time: the full participation of women is absolutely essential to building, maintaining and restoring peaceful communities. Please contact (coordinator@globalactionpw.org) for information on how to obtain a hardcopy of the book..

A PDF version of the full text can be found here.

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“Trust and Distrust: The Possibility of a UN Emergency Peace Service”

Final Report from Study from April 2007-August 2010

uneps_report_pagenumber001Between July 2007 and August 2010, interviews on the UN Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) proposal were conducted with over 80 respondents from different professional, political, religious and cultural backgrounds. They included senior academics, current and former diplomats and other government officials, and experts from leading non-governmental organizations working on issues of peace and security. The interviewees were from Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia, North America, and Australia. They offered a combination of person and professional opinions on the proposal. Interviews were mostly conducted face-to-face though some were over the phone. Respondents’ attitudes were also captured through regional round-table discussions held by Global Action to Prevent War (GAPW) often in collaboration with local universities or think-tanks as well as discussions and interactions from previous UNEPS conferences

The full report can be accessed here.


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Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Relationship with the UN

January 20, 2011

Dr Lester Ruiz, one of our most valued associates, recently presented a paper at the General Assembly of the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations (CoNGO).  His remarks, both wise and occasionally controversial, are intended to get NGOs like GAPW to think longer and harder about the ways in which we do our ‘business.’

Specifically, he recommends steps that we have tried to follow in our own practice - including the need for UN-based NGOs to more vigorously engage diverse elements of civil society worldwide and more effectively act as a conduit for local and regional perspectives on human security issues.  He also advocates for NGOs to occasionally ‘hold the mirror’ up to their own practices in the same way that we try to do with governments.

Ruiz’s piece is challenging, but provides many insights for those of us in this sector needed to refresh our role in the UN community and in the much broader community of civil society engagement.

For the full paper, click here.

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December 2010 | UNU, Tokyo, Japan

unu-logo-3c-11Global Action to Prevent War and United Nations University Institute for Sustainability and Peace (UNU-ISP) have collaborated on a policy brief based on an expert’s panel held at the UNU on 8 September 2010, in partnership with the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security and Soka Gakkai International. The panel drew together a diverse group of academics, advocates and policymakers from UN agencies as well as organizations in Japan, the Phillippines, Australia, Pakistan and the US. All participants have worked at various levels– academic, policy, direct-action– to contribute to efforts towards ensuring the full participation of women in peace policies and processes, and ending impunity for gender-based violence.

This brief also draws upon the report Promoting Women’s Participation in Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies: How Women Worldwide are Making and Building Peace by Kavitha Suthanthiraraj and Cristina Ayo, published by GAPW in conjunction with the NGOWG on Women, Peace and Security and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

For the full policy brief in PDF form, please click here.

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Standing for Change in Peacekeeping Operations

Global Action just launched its new publication during a workshop on Peacekeeping and Civilians Protection in Jakarta, Indonesia in June 2009.

Standing for Change in Peacekeeping Operations.”

The aim of this publication is to provide diverse regional perspectives on the need for UN-based standing capacity such as UNEPS. Over 70 interviews were conducted in Latin America, Africa, North America and South East Asia with senior academics, current and former diplomats, UN and government officials, UN mission staff and experts from leading non-governmental organizations. Research work was undertaken by GAPW staff and by Annie Hero from the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPACS) at the University of Sydney.

Juan Mendes, former Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide, made an important contribution to the publication, providing an analysis of challenges to the prevention of genocide based on his 32 months of experience inside the UN.

This volume represents a new stage in the evolution of the United Nations Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) project. Focusing on diverse regional perspectives, key recommendations have been incorporated to help refine the UNEPS proposal, push forward the standing capacity agenda and ensure that UN peacekeeping can respond effectively to the humanitarian and security emergencies for which it is ultimately held accountable.

For a PDF version of the publication, please click here.

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‘Good Faith Negotiations Leading to the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons’

Global Action to Prevent War is pleased to highlight ‘Good Faith Negotiations Leading to the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons,’ written by a high-profile team of experts, including John Burroughs of the Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy.

From the policy perspective, this volume signals the need for the International Court of Justice to render a secondGood Faith Cover advisory opinion that clarifies a 1996 ruling confirming that the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty requires states to “pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control.” The NPT Review Conference in 2010 represents our next best chance to re-link disarmament and non-proliferation obligations under an effective regime that provides the structure and the motivation to bring both goals to an effective and even final culmination.

Having an ICJ ruling that lays out in specific terms the negotiation obligations of states parties at this critical time for nuclear weapons negotiations would be most helpful. The authors of this volume understand that ‘good intentions’ are no substitute for deliberative and honest negotiations that are directed at reaching a final agreement that can finally move us closer to a disarmed world.

‘Good faith’ is one of those hopeful terms that help us to bridge the chasms separating our personal and professional lives. But it is a term that requires clarity of expectation. With this volume, the authors are asking the court to lay out the evidence by which we can know that our nuclear policymakers are acting, truly, in good faith. This is an important step that all of us who promote or long for global disarmament should support.

The book can be found online. For paper copies, email johnburroughs@lcnp.org.

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June 30, 2010 | New York City

thumb_front_cover_analytical_inventory_of_peacekeeping_practice_onlineOn Wednesday June 30th the Permanent Mission of Australia in conjunction with UNIFEM, the UN Action Stop Rape Now campaign and DPKO hosted the launch of Addressing Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: An Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice. This 44-page publication will serve as a new tool for peacekeepers in addressing women’s security concerns. Funded by the Australian Government’s aid agency AusAID, the publication is a first-ever review of “efforts by uniformed peacekeepers to prevent, deter and respond to widespread and systematic sexual violence”. It is part of a broader effort to improve civilian protection capacities. The report examines the advantages of women in uniform in areas such as Liberia and Afghanistan and provides recommendations to avoid predictable risks such as rape and reprisal of attacks on women.

Please click here for the complete synopsis.

Please click here to download the toolbook.

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Peacekeeping and Peace Enforcement in Africa: The Potential Contribution of a UN Emergency Peace Service

By Annie Herro, of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Sydney and Global Action’s Australian Coordinator; Wendy Lambourne; and David Penklis

“Nuclear Abolition, Climate Change and Our Cities’ Future”

Produced by Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy and prepared by Mariah Quinn

“It’s Time to Give the UN Some Teeth”

By Annie Herro, of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Sydney and Global Action’s Australian Coordinator.

Rutgers Law Review: On the 60th Anniversary of UN Genocide Convention

By: Alex Hinton, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights; and Saul Mendlovitz, of Rutgers University Law School and Co-Founder of Global Action.

Real Peace, Real Security: The Challenges of Global Citizenship

By: Sharon Welch, Provost of the Meadville-Lombard Theological School and member of Global Action’s Executive Committee.

2008 Irish Defense Review

A UN Emergency Peace Service: To Prevent Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
By: Robert C. Johansen

A United Nations Emergency Peace Service: Proposal Update
By: Robert Zuber

Enhancing Capacity for Rapid and Effective Troop Deployment

By: Kavitha Suthanthiraraj, Global Action’s International Coordinator

Small Arms Monitor: 2008 Biennial Meeting of States

The Small Arms Monitor is a daily publication produced by Reaching Critical Will and the Arms Control Reporter during conferences at the United Nations related to small arms and light weapons.

UNEPS - To Prevent Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Global Action to Prevent War, in collaboration with the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation and the World Federalist Movement, recently published “A United Nations Emergency Peace Service”. This book includes the following: uneps-cover1

  • The detailed proposal for an Emergency Peace Service, including expert discussion and analysis on its various components
  • Preface by Sir Brian Urquhart, former UN Under-Secretary-General for Special Political Affairs
  • Afterword by Lt. Gen. Satish Nambiar, first force commander of the UN peacekeeping mission in the former Yugoslavia
  • Comments on the initiative by representatives from South Africa, Brazil and the USA

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